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Artificial intelligence holds great potential for both students and teachers but only if used wisely

Simon Knight and Simon Buckingham Shum write in The Conversation (24.7.17) that policy makers and education experts should consider how artificial intelligence will impact how teachers teach, what they teach, and its potential to ethically support innovation and improvement in education.

'Artificial intelligence (AI) enables Siri to recognise your question, Google to correct your spelling, and tools such as Kinect to track you as you move around the room.

'Data big and small have come to education, from creating online platforms to increasing standardised assessments. But how can AI help us use and improve it?

'Researchers in AI in education have been investigating how the two intersect for several decades. While it’s tempting to think that the primary dream for AI in education is to reduce marking load – a prospect made real through automated essay scoring – the breadth of applications goes beyond this.

'… The future of learning with AI, and other technologies, should be targeted not only at learning subject content, but also at cultivating curiosity, creativity and resilience.

'The ethical development of such innovations will require both teachers and students to have a robust understanding of how to work with data and AI to support their participation in society and across the professions.'

 

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